Strange Islands.



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My life as a scrapbook.






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klammer
As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies draw flame;
As tumbled over rim in roundy wells
Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell’s
Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name;
Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
Selves — goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,
Crying Whát I dó is me: for that I came.

Gerard Manley Hopkins (28 July 1844 – 8 June 1889)

via


10:32 pm, by jamreilly18 notes Comments

This image appears to be a procession of elephants but is, in fact, a much-magnified small detail of one of the Mandelbrot set.
via 50 Visions Of Mathematics

This image appears to be a procession of elephants but is, in fact, a much-magnified small detail of one of the Mandelbrot set.

via 50 Visions Of Mathematics

10:36 pm, by jamreilly9 notes Comments



gerda-kay:

Florence Henri, Carrousel (Le cygne), 1928.

gerda-kay:

Florence Henri, Carrousel (Le cygne), 1928.

10:49 am, reblogged from VIVRE ! by jamreilly25 notes Comments

The violence of the early universe was so extreme that it would leave space-time itself ringing like a bell.

08:50 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

The availability heuristic helps explain why some issues are highly salient in the public’s mind while others are neglected. People tend to assess the relative importance of issues by the ease with which they are retrieved from memory - and this is largely determined by the extent of coverage in the media.
Daniel Kahneman: Thinking Fast And Slow (2011)

09:04 pm, by jamreilly3 notes Comments

Men would never be superstitious, if they could govern all their circumstances by set rules, or if they were always favoured by fortune: but being frequently driven into straits where rules are useless, and being often kept fluctuating pitiably between hope and fear by the uncertainty of fortune’s greedily coveted favours, they are consequently, for the most part, very prone to credulity. The human mind is readily swayed this way or that in times of doubt, especially when hope and fear are struggling for the mastery, though usually it is boastful, over-confident, and vain.

Baruch Spinoza

Preface to Theologico-Political Treatise (1670).


07:35 pm, by jamreilly5 notes Comments



Zacuto’s Almanach perpetuum helped immediately revolutionize ocean navigation.

Zacuto developed a new type of astrolabe, specialized for practical determination of latitude while at sea, in contrast to earlier multipurpose devices intended for use ashore. Abraham Zacuto’s principal claim to fame is the great astronomical treatise, written while he was in Salamanca, in Hebrew, with the title Ha-ḥibbur ha-gadol (“The Great Book”), begun around 1470 and completed in 1478.

 

Zacuto’s Almanach perpetuum helped immediately revolutionize ocean navigation.

Zacuto developed a new type of astrolabe, specialized for practical determination of latitude while at sea, in contrast to earlier multipurpose devices intended for use ashore. Abraham Zacuto’s principal claim to fame is the great astronomical treatise, written while he was in Salamanca, in Hebrew, with the title Ha-ḥibbur ha-gadol (“The Great Book”), begun around 1470 and completed in 1478.

 

12:38 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments




Hiroshige : Fireworks at Ryōgoku

 

Hiroshige : Fireworks at Ryōgoku

 


There is not often much success for the things you do through the eyes of others.

Livy

via the Adages of Erasmus.

edited by Margaret Mann Phillips (1967).


01:34 pm, by jamreilly6 notes Comments



Figure of the heavenly bodies — An illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system by Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velho, 1568 (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)
via

Figure of the heavenly bodies — An illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system by Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velho, 1568 (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)

via

08:58 pm, by jamreilly2 notes Comments



endilletante:

sans titre [Polish record sleeve] by pantuniestal on Flickr.

endilletante:

sans titre [Polish record sleeve] by pantuniestal on Flickr.


The Joyless Economy suggested that our freely chosen ends may be
the very source of our unhappiness. Scitovsky (1976) wrote:

We gradually dismantled the Laws of God and came to believe in man as the final arbiter of what is best for him. That was a bold idea and a proud assumption, but it set back for generations all scientific inquiry into consumer behavior, for it seemed to rule out—as a logical impossibility—any conflict between what man chooses to get and what will best satisfy him.

Preferences Or Happiness? Tibor Scitovsky’s Psychology Of Human Needs

10:11 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

The mind and the body are one and the same thing, which is conceived now under the attribute of thought, now under the attribute of extension.

- Baruch Spinoza (1632 - 1677).

Ethics, (part 2, proposition 21, scholium).


06:26 pm, by jamreilly3 notes Comments



Landschap met val van Icarus
(Landscape with the Fall of Icarus)
Pieter Brueghel the Elder (circa. 1558)
via wikiP

Landschap met val van Icarus

(Landscape with the Fall of Icarus)

Pieter Brueghel the Elder (circa. 1558)

via wikiP

06:22 pm, by jamreilly5 notes Comments

Descartes was no fool; by parsing reality into the res extensa and res cogitans he captured something critical about human experience. You do not need to be a hard-core dualist to imagine that subjective experience might not be amenable to mathematical law. For Douglas, ‘the attempt to force experience into logical categories of non-contradiction’ is the ‘final paradox’ of an obsessive search for purity. ‘But experience is not amenable [to this narrowing],’ she insists, and ‘those who make the attempt find themselves led into contradictions.’

Quintessentially, the qualities that are amenable to quantification are those that are shared. All electrons are essentially the same: given a set of physical circumstances, every electron will behave like any other. But humans are not like this. It is our individuality that makes us so infuriatingly human, and when science attempts to reduce us to the status of electrons it is no wonder that professors of literature scoff.


02:57 pm, by jamreilly126 notes Comments