Strange Islands.



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My life as a scrapbook.






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Zacuto’s Almanach perpetuum helped immediately revolutionize ocean navigation.

Zacuto developed a new type of astrolabe, specialized for practical determination of latitude while at sea, in contrast to earlier multipurpose devices intended for use ashore. Abraham Zacuto’s principal claim to fame is the great astronomical treatise, written while he was in Salamanca, in Hebrew, with the title Ha-ḥibbur ha-gadol (“The Great Book”), begun around 1470 and completed in 1478.

 

Zacuto’s Almanach perpetuum helped immediately revolutionize ocean navigation.

Zacuto developed a new type of astrolabe, specialized for practical determination of latitude while at sea, in contrast to earlier multipurpose devices intended for use ashore. Abraham Zacuto’s principal claim to fame is the great astronomical treatise, written while he was in Salamanca, in Hebrew, with the title Ha-ḥibbur ha-gadol (“The Great Book”), begun around 1470 and completed in 1478.

 

12:38 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments




Hiroshige : Fireworks at Ryōgoku

 

Hiroshige : Fireworks at Ryōgoku

 


There is not often much success for the things you do through the eyes of others.

Livy

via the Adages of Erasmus.

edited by Margaret Mann Phillips (1967).


01:34 pm, by jamreilly5 notes Comments



Figure of the heavenly bodies — An illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system by Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velho, 1568 (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)
via

Figure of the heavenly bodies — An illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system by Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velho, 1568 (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)

via

08:58 pm, by jamreilly2 notes Comments



endilletante:

sans titre [Polish record sleeve] by pantuniestal on Flickr.

endilletante:

sans titre [Polish record sleeve] by pantuniestal on Flickr.


The Joyless Economy suggested that our freely chosen ends may be
the very source of our unhappiness. Scitovsky (1976) wrote:

We gradually dismantled the Laws of God and came to believe in man as the final arbiter of what is best for him. That was a bold idea and a proud assumption, but it set back for generations all scientific inquiry into consumer behavior, for it seemed to rule out—as a logical impossibility—any conflict between what man chooses to get and what will best satisfy him.

Preferences Or Happiness? Tibor Scitovsky’s Psychology Of Human Needs

10:11 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

The mind and the body are one and the same thing, which is conceived now under the attribute of thought, now under the attribute of extension.

- Baruch Spinoza (1632 - 1677).

Ethics, (part 2, proposition 21, scholium).


06:26 pm, by jamreilly3 notes Comments



Landschap met val van Icarus
(Landscape with the Fall of Icarus)
Pieter Brueghel the Elder (circa. 1558)
via wikiP

Landschap met val van Icarus

(Landscape with the Fall of Icarus)

Pieter Brueghel the Elder (circa. 1558)

via wikiP

06:22 pm, by jamreilly5 notes Comments

Descartes was no fool; by parsing reality into the res extensa and res cogitans he captured something critical about human experience. You do not need to be a hard-core dualist to imagine that subjective experience might not be amenable to mathematical law. For Douglas, ‘the attempt to force experience into logical categories of non-contradiction’ is the ‘final paradox’ of an obsessive search for purity. ‘But experience is not amenable [to this narrowing],’ she insists, and ‘those who make the attempt find themselves led into contradictions.’

Quintessentially, the qualities that are amenable to quantification are those that are shared. All electrons are essentially the same: given a set of physical circumstances, every electron will behave like any other. But humans are not like this. It is our individuality that makes us so infuriatingly human, and when science attempts to reduce us to the status of electrons it is no wonder that professors of literature scoff.


02:57 pm, by jamreilly122 notes Comments

09:02 pm, by jamreilly7 notes Comments

Imaginary time may sound like science fiction, and it has been brought into Doctor Who. But nevertheless, it is a genuine scientific concept. One can picture it in the following way. One can think of ordinary, real, time as a horizontal line. On the left, one has the past, and on the right, the future. But there’s another kind of time in the vertical direction. This is called imaginary time, because it is not the kind of time we normally experience. But in a sense, it is just as real, as what we call real time.
The three directions in space, and the one direction of imaginary time, make up what is called a Euclidean space-time.

06:52 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

07:21 pm, by jamreilly2 notes Comments



European Bramble
from the Vienna Dioscurides, 6th-century C.E.

European Bramble

from the Vienna Dioscurides6th-century C.E.

06:35 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

Well, then, someone who thinks that he can set down an art in writing, and equally someone who accepts something from writing as though it were going to be clear and reliable, must be very simple-minded ..
You know, Phaedrus, writing shares a strange feature with painting. The offspring of painting stand there as if they were alive, but if anyone asks them anything, they are solemnly silent. The same is true of written words. You’d think they were speaking as if they had some understanding, but if you question anything that has been said because you want to learn more, it gives just the same answer over and over.

Plato - Phaedrus (c.370 BC)

Translation by Bernard Williams.


07:59 pm, by jamreilly1 note Comments

From Fritz Der Wolkenfahrer 
via 50Watts: Stopping Off Place

From Fritz Der Wolkenfahrer 

via 50Watts: Stopping Off Place

03:46 pm, by jamreilly2 notes Comments