I took advantage of being at the seaside to lay          in a store of sucking-stones. They were pebbles but I call them stones. Yes, on this occasion I laid in a considerable store. I distributed them equally between my four pockets, and sucked them turn and turn about. This raised a problem which I first solved in the following way. I had say sixteen stones, four in each of my four pockets these being the two pockets of my trousers and          the two pockets of my greatcoat. Taking a stone from the right pocket of my greatcoat, and putting it in my mouth, I replaced it in the right pocket of my greatcoat by a stone from the right pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my greatcoat, which I replaced by the stone which was in my mouth, as soon as I had finished sucking it. Thus there were still four stones in each of my four pockets, but not quite the same stones. And when the desire to suck took hold of me again, I drew again on the right pocket of my greatcoat, certain of not taking the same stone as the last time. And while I sucked it I rearranged the other stones in the way I have just described. And so on. But this solution did not satisfy me fully. For it did not escape me that, by an extraordinary hazard, the          four stones circulating thus might always be the same four. In which case, far from sucking the sixteen stones turn and turn about, I was really only sucking four, always the same, turn and turn about. But I shuffled them well in my pockets, before I began to suck, and again, while I sucked, before transferring them, in the hope of obtaining a more general circulation of the stones from pocket to pocket. But this was only a makeshift that could not long content a man like me. So I began to look for something else …

from Molloy by Samuel Beckett.
First published in English by Olympia Press, Paris, 1955.
text via Samuel-Beckett.net

I took advantage of being at the seaside to lay in a store of sucking-stones. They were pebbles but I call them stones. Yes, on this occasion I laid in a considerable store. I distributed them equally between my four pockets, and sucked them turn and turn about. This raised a problem which I first solved in the following way. I had say sixteen stones, four in each of my four pockets these being the two pockets of my trousers and the two pockets of my greatcoat. Taking a stone from the right pocket of my greatcoat, and putting it in my mouth, I replaced it in the right pocket of my greatcoat by a stone from the right pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my greatcoat, which I replaced by the stone which was in my mouth, as soon as I had finished sucking it. Thus there were still four stones in each of my four pockets, but not quite the same stones. And when the desire to suck took hold of me again, I drew again on the right pocket of my greatcoat, certain of not taking the same stone as the last time. And while I sucked it I rearranged the other stones in the way I have just described. And so on. But this solution did not satisfy me fully. For it did not escape me that, by an extraordinary hazard, the four stones circulating thus might always be the same four. In which case, far from sucking the sixteen stones turn and turn about, I was really only sucking four, always the same, turn and turn about. But I shuffled them well in my pockets, before I began to suck, and again, while I sucked, before transferring them, in the hope of obtaining a more general circulation of the stones from pocket to pocket. But this was only a makeshift that could not long content a man like me. So I began to look for something else …

from Molloy by Samuel Beckett.

First published in English by Olympia Press, Paris, 1955.

text via Samuel-Beckett.net


Where the liberal-humanist sensibility has always held the literary work to be a form of self-expression, a meticulous sculpting of the thoughts and feelings of an isolated individual who has mastered his or her poetic craft, a technologically savvy sensibility might see it completely differently: as a set of transmissions, filtered through subjects whom technology and the live word have ruptured, broken open, made receptive. I know which side I’m on: the more books I write, the more convinced I become that what we encounter in a novel is not selves, but networks; that what we hear in poems is (to use the language of communications technology) not signal but noise. The German poet Rilke had a word for it: Geräusch, the crackle of the universe, angels dancing in the static.

On A Novel’s First Line

"My favourite opening line is from Albert Camus’s The Stranger : “Mother died today. Or maybe yesterday, I don’t know.”. It’s punchy, colloquial, and disturbing. It also taps out a rhythm for the rest of the book. Another would be from Swann’s Way by Proust: “For a long time I went to sleep early.” It reverses the basic expectation with which you start a novel – to see activity, thought, or change of some kind. Instead you fall straight into sleep and the underworld. It’s hypnotic. First lines – and first pages – are so important when you’re unpublished and trying to get an agent or publisher’s attention. You know that she won’t look past a page or two, so you’re trying to pack as much as you can into the opening sentence. When I began writing, I assumed that first sentences had to be flamboyant; unexpected; long and dazzling to the reader and also encoded cunningly with the big themes of the book. You began with a Douglas Fairbanks-meets-Michel Foucault sort of first line. I no longer think that. The point of the first sentence of a book is to get someone to read the second sentence. I think the real unit is the first page and not the first sentence. I do spend a lot of time on the first page, and I try to make it interesting enough so that someone browsing in a store would, on the basis of the first page, consider buying my book.”

- Aravind Adiga

via Irish Times